Allocentrism

I’m watching a video with Jeff Hawkins explaining his latest hypotheses and theories about how the brain functions and in the accompanying chat, I saw this word I’d never encountered before: Allocentrism.

Allocentrism is a collectivistic personality attribute whereby people center their attention and actions on other people rather than themselves. It is a psychological dimension which corresponds to the general cultural dimension of collectivism. In fact, allocentrics “believe, feel, and act very much like collectivists do around the world.” Allocentric people tend to be interdependent, define themselves in terms of the group that they are part of, and behave according to that group’s cultural norms. They tend to have a sense of duty and share beliefs with other allocentrics among their in-group. Allocentric people appear to see themselves as an extension of their in-group and allow their own goals to be subsumed by the in-group’s goals. Additionally, allocentrism has been defined as giving priority to the collective self over the private self, particularly if these two selves happen to come into conflict.

I won’t comment on this. At least not right now.

I must note, however, they were using the term this way.

Previously here:

Human Variables category

This entry was posted in Human Variables, Reference. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.